In the late 1980s, he commissioned architect Michael Reynolds to design and build his new residence, which incorporated into its construction various recycled materials, such as old automobile tires and discarded cans, and featured passive solar power and other ecotechnologies. He starred in the 1971 television film Duel, the first film of director Steven Spielberg.

To install click the Add extension button. In the beginning of his acting career, he supported his family by doing odd jobs, including selling vacuum cleaners, tricycles, and women's hosiery.

In the beginning of his acting career, he supported his family by doing odd jobs, including selling vacuum cleaners, tricycles, and women's hosiery. Weaver received probably the best reviews of his career when he starred in the 1987 film Bluffing It, in which he played a man who is illiterate.

[21], There will come a time ... when civilized people will look back in horror on our generation and the ones that preceded it — the idea that we should eat other living things running around on four legs, that we should raise them just for the purpose of killing them!

[18], Weaver was consistently involved with the annual Genesis Awards, which honor those in the news and entertainment media who bring attention to the plight and suffering of animals. [20], In 2004, he led a fleet of alternative-fuel vehicles across the United States to raise awareness about America's dependence on oil.

Under the name Billy D. Weaver, he tried out for the 1948 U.S. Olympic team in the decathlon,[3] finishing sixth behind 17-year-old high school track star Bob Mathias. He portrayed a Navy rear admiral for 22 episodes of a 1983–1984 series, Emerald Point N.A.S..

In 1952, Shelley Winters helped him get a contract from Universal Studios. He was 81.His wife, Gerry, passed away in 2017. His role on the show was cut short due to his death. He starred in the 1971 television film Duel, the first film of director Steven Spielberg. Established by the Ark Trust, the award has been presented by the Humane Society of the United States since 2002. In that episode, Weaver's character is trapped inside his own revolving nightmare, repeatedly being tried, sentenced, and then executed in the electric chair. Over the next three years, he played in a series of movies, but still had to work odd jobs to support his family. Weaver wanted to be an actor from childhood.

William Dennis Weaver[1] (June 4, 1924 – February 24, 2006) was an American actor and former president of the Screen Actors Guild, best known for his work in television and films from the early 1950s until just before his death in 2006. While at the university, he was chosen for the 1948 United States Olympic Trials, where he finished 6th in the decathlon. Gerry died April 26, 2016, at 90. [2] After the war, he married Gerry Stowell (his childhood sweetheart), with whom he had three children. He made his film debut that same year in the movie The Redhead from Wyoming. During the series, in 1971, Weaver also appeared in Duel, a television movie directed by Steven Spielberg. He married Gerry Stowell after World War II and they had three sons: Richard, Robert, and Rustin Weaver. According to the Archive of American Television interview with Weaver, the producer had him in mind for Chester, but could not locate him, and was delighted when he showed up to audition. His later series during the 1980s (both of which lasted only one season) were Stone in which Weaver played a Joseph Wambaugh-esque police sergeant turned crime novelist and Buck James in which he played a Texas-based surgeon and rancher. (1980), Tales of the Gold Monkey (1982) and The Ray Bradbury Theater (1985). Dennis was a football, baskeball, and track star in Joplin Junior College. After the war, he returned to school, graduating from the University of Oklahoma at Norman with a degree in Fine Arts and Theater. [18], Weaver was also active in liberal political causes. Den­nis Weaver was a veg­e­tar­ian since 1958 and stu­dent of yoga and med­i­ta­tion since the 1960s and a de­voted fol­lower of Parama­hansa Yo­gananda, the In­dian guru who es­tab­lished the Self-Re­al­iza­tion Fel­low­shipin the United States. In 1978, Weaver played the trail boss R. J. Poteet in the television miniseries Centennial, in the installment titled "The Longhorns". All Rights Reserved. The show, about a modern Western lawman who ends up in New York City, was loosely based on the Clint Eastwood film Coogan's Bluff. It will enhance any encyclopedic page you visit with the magic of the WIKI 2 technology. Weaver's first role on Broadway came as an understudy to Lonny Chapman as Turk Fisher in Come Back, Little Sheba. "Dennis Weaver selling Colorado 'Earthship' home,", "A TV hero for real-life change: Dennis Weaver, actor, 1924–2006" in, Best Supporting Actor (Continuing Character) in a Dramatic Series, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, The Complete Directory to Prime Time Network and Cable TV Shows 1946–Present, "Infant Dies From Injuries Suffered in Farmers Market Crash", "Democrats Hope to Get $6 Million in Telethon", "Dennis Weaver, 81; Star of 'Gunsmoke,' 'McCloud' Also Was Environmental Activist", Archive of American Television 2½ hour career-wide interview with Dennis Weaver, Animal Planet Genesis Awards, commentary on going Vegetarian in 1958, "Dennis Weaver, 81, Sidekick on 'Gunsmoke,' Dies", "Dennis Weaver, 81; Star of ' Gunsmoke,' 'McCloud' Also Was Environmental Activist", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Dennis_Weaver&oldid=986744995, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, Dodge City 50th Anniversary local newspaper report, This page was last edited on 2 November 2020, at 19:22. [9], Weaver was also a recording artist, with most of his tracks being spoken-word recordings with musical accompaniment. They have two children. Dennis was also a fine athlete.

He also hosted segments for the Encore Westerns premium cable network in the late 1990s and 2000s. "Ecolonomics" is a term formed by combining the words ecology and economics. [4] Weaver later commented, "I did so poorly [in the Olympic Trials], I decided to ... stay in New York and try acting."[3]. He studied at Joplin Junior College, now Missouri Southern State University, then transferred to the University of Oklahoma at Norman, where he studied drama and was a track star, setting records in several events. He is also remembered for his role as the twitchy motel attendant in Orson Welles' film Touch of Evil (1958). That's it. From boyhood, Dennis wanted to be an actor. Weaver married Gerry Stowell after World War II and they had three sons: Richard, Robert, and Rustin Weaver. In 1981, he was inducted into the Hall of Great Western Performers with the Bronze Wrangler Award at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Having become famous as Chester, he was next cast in an offbeat supporting role in the 1958 Orson Welles film Touch of Evil,[7] in which he played a face-twisting, body-contorting eccentric employee of a remote motel who nervously repeated, "I'm the night man." Established by the Ark Trust, the award has been presented by the Humane Society of the United States since 2002.

Weaver wanted to be an actor from childhood. (Love is Feeding Everyone), which provided food for 150,000 needy people a week in Los Angeles. [10] He released several singles and albums between 1959 and 1984, most notable of which was his eponymous Im'press Records LP in 1972, the cover of which featured a portrait of Weaver in character as McCloud; it was the first of seven albums he recorded.[11]. [16], Weaver was a lifelong active Democrat. Ryon, Ruth (2004). Dennis Weaver was a vegetarian since 1958 and student of yoga and meditation since the 1960s and a devoted follower of Paramahansa Yogananda, the Indian guru who established the Self-Realization Fellowshipin the United States. He mar­ried Gerry Stow­ell after World War II and they had three sons: Richard, Robert, and Rustin Weaver. From 1973 to 1975, Weaver was president of the Screen Actors Guild. Surviving him are his three sons, Rick, Rob, and Rusty, and three grandchildren, Jennifer, Brandon, Travis, and Jess. Over the years Dennis, a singer and songwriter, performed with his wife, Gerry (now deceased) often on stage with their sons as well. His next substantial role was as Tom Wedloe on the CBS family series Gentle Ben, with co-star Clint Howard, from 1967 to 1969. Dennis Weaver, actor, humanitarian, and pioneer environmentalist, succumbed to complications from cancer February 2006.

In 1974, he was nominated for Best Lead Actor in a Limited Series (McCloud) and in 1975, for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series. Weaver's first role on Broadway came as an understudy to Lonny Chapman as Turk Fisher in Come Back, Little Sheba. Weaver's last work was done on an ABC Family cable television show called Wildfire, where he played Henry Ritter, the father of Jean Ritter and the co-owner of Raintree Ranch. [18][19] He was also involved with John Denver's WindStar Foundation, and he founded an organization called L.I.F.E.

In 1970, Weaver landed the title role in the NBC series McCloud, for which he received two Emmy Award nominations. In the 1980s and 1990s, Weaver as McCloud was used to promote a rock show in New York City. In 1981, he was inducted into the Hall of Great Western Performers with the Bronze Wrangler Award at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Under the name Billy D. Weaver, he tried out for the 1948 U.S. Olympic team in the decathlon,[3] finishing sixth behind 17-year-old high school track star Bob Mathias. He studied at Joplin Junior College, now Missouri Southern State University, then transferred to the University of Oklahoma at Norman, where he studied drama and was a track star, setting records in several events. Spielberg selected Weaver based on the intensity of his earlier performance in Touch of Evil. Dennis Weaver was a vegetarian since 1958[14] and student of yoga and meditation since the 1960s and a devoted follower of Paramahansa Yogananda, the Indian guru who established the Self-Realization Fellowship in the United States. In the late 1980s, he commissioned architect Michael Reynolds to design a… Having become famous as Chester, he was next cast in an offbeat supporting role in the 1958 Orson Welles film Touch of Evil,[7] in which he played a face-twisting, body-contorting eccentric employee of a remote motel who nervously repeated, "I'm the night man."

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